Cooking Techniques

We understand that cooking different cuts of meat in different ways can be quite mind boggling!

“To Cook Food” means to heat it in order to make certain changes to it. We've listed the most common cooking techniques with easy to follow guidelines:

  • Stir Fry+-


    Stir frying is an Asian technique for cooking meat and vegetables quickly, so they retain texture and flavour. It’s a quick and easy way of cooking meat and vegetables and creating a tasty meal for your family.

    Use a small amount of oil (1 tbsp) and make sure your wok or large frying pan is very hot before adding the meat. The meat should be cut into small strips, cut across the grain which will help tenderise the meat and prevent shrinkage.

    Cut Cooking Time

    Beef:

    Sirloin, Rump

    2-4 minutes plus 2 minutes with vegetables

    Lamb:

    Leg, Neck

    2-4 minutes plus 2 minutes with vegetables

    Pork:

    Leg, Neck

    2-4 minutes plus 2 minutes with vegetables

    Method:

    1. Heat 1tbsp oil in a wok or large frying pan
    2. Add the meat and stir-fry
    3. Add the hardest vegetables first such as carrots and cook for 2-3 minutes before adding the remaining vegetables
    4. Add a sauce of your choice and cook for a further couple of minutes

     


  • Roast+-


    Weigh the raw joint and calculate the cooking time using the guide below.

    When roasting the secret is to cook the joint in a moderate oven for slightly longer to ensure even cooking.

    Dry Roasting: Gas Mark 4-5, 180-190°C, 350-375°F

    Cut Cooking Time

    Beef Joints:

    Brisket, Rib, Silverside, Sirloin, Topside

    Rare: 20 minutes per 450g + 20 minutes

    Medium: 25 minutes per 450g + 25 minutes

    Well-done: 30 minutes per 450g + 30 minutes

    Lamb Joints:

    Breast/Boned & rolled breast, Leg, Loin,
    Neck, Rack, Saddle, Shank, Shoulder

    Quick Roasting - 200°C, 400°F, Gas mark 6

    20-30 minutes per 450g/1lb plus an extra 20 minutes

    Slow Roasting - 180°C, 350°F, Gas mark 4

    35 minutes per 450g/1lb plus an extra 35 minutes

    Pork Joints:

    Loin, Leg, Rib, Back

    Medium: 30 minutes per 450g + 30 minutes

    Well-done: 35 minutes per 450g + 35 minutes



    Rest for 20-30 minutes before carving after cooking to let the meat fibres relax and juices distribute evenly so the joint is moist and easy to carve.
     


  • Braise+-


    This method is often called braising, pot roasting, casseroling, stewing or slow cooking - all of which mean roasting with liquid.

    These methods are ideal for tenderising meat. They are a very convenient way of cooking as they require little preparation or attention. Just let it cook whilst you relax.

    Cut Cooking Time

    Beef:

    Brisket, Rib, Silverside, Topside, Shin,
    Leg, Neck & Clod, Chuck & Blade,
    Thick Rib, Top Rump

    30 – 40 minutes per 450g + 30 – 40 minutes

    Stew – 2 to 3 hours

    Braise (shin, leg,neck) – 1½ to 2½ hours

    Slow cook 6-7 hours

    Lamb:

    Neck, Leg, Breast, Shank, Shoulder

    1 to 1½ hours

    Slow cook 6-7 hours

    Pork:

    Ribs, Belly, Leg, Chump, Loin, Tenderloin

    Braise 1 to 1½ hours

    Slow cook 6-7 hours

    Method:

    1. Heat 1tbsp oil in a large pan or casserole dish
    2. Brown the joint on all sides
    3. Add vegetables such as root vegetables, liquid such as stock, wine, cider, beer etc and any seasoning or herbs
    4. Cover and cook

     


  • Barbeque+-


    It is thought that the word "Barbeque" originated as Barbecoa. The word describes a grill for cooking meat, consisting of a wooden platform resting on sticks.

    Light your BBQ well in advance. If using charcoal wait until it's glowing red before starting to cook.

    Keep your meat in the fridge for as long as possible before cooking.

    Make sure the chef doesn’t mix up utensils, chopping boards or plates for raw and cooked food.

    Ensure burgers and sausages are thoroughly cooked and piping hot before serving.

    Keep a spray bottle with fresh water to knock down flames that start to get out of control.

    Put on the food that cooks the quickest when the fire is the hottest. Put on the food that takes the longest, like the larger cuts of meat, after the fire has cooled down. You don't want the outside of these cuts to char or burn and leave the inside raw.

    How Much Meat Per Person?

    ½  pound of boneless meat per person is usually plenty however a little extra can always be refrigerated and eaten cold the next day.

    Don't fill up the entire grill with food. You need to have an empty spot to be able to move food that gets to too hot and wants to flare up.

    Always wash hand thoroughly – before preparing food and after touching raw meat and before eating.


  • Pan Fry+-


    This is a quick cooking method for small tender cuts of meat.

    Cut Cooking Time

    Beef:

    Sirloin, Rump, Rib-eye

    Rare: 2½ minutes each side

    Medium: 4 minutes each side

    Well-done: 6 minutes each side

    Burgers

    4-6 minutes each side

    Lamb:

    Shoulder Steaks, Chops, Cutlets, Loin, Chump

    Braise 1 to 1½ hours

    ¾ inch thick Leg, Chump, Shoulder, Loin

    4-6 minutes each side

    1 inch thick Leg, Chump, Shoulder, Loin

    6-8 minutes each side

     Burgers

    4-6 minutes each side

     Method:

    1. Use a heavy based frying pan, sauté pan or wok
    2. For best results only use only a small amount of oil or butter
    3. Sear each side quickly to seal in the juices and retain its succulence
    4. Only turn once; leaving them untouched will produce juicier results

     


  • Grill+-


    Grilling is a fast dry alternative to pan frying for cooking tender cuts. Only turn your steaks once during cooking, leaving them to cook untouched will produce juicier results.

    Cut Cooking Time

    Beef

    Fillet Steak

    Rare: 3-4 minutes each side

    Medium: 4-5 minutes each side

    Well-done: 6-7 minutes each side

    Sirloin, Rump, Rib-eye

    Rare: 2½ minutes each side

    Medium: 4 minutes each side

    Well-done: 6 minutes each side

    Burgers

    4-6 minutes each side

    Lamb:

    ¾ inch thick Leg (bone-in and boneless), Chump, Shoulder, Loin

    4-6 minutes each side

    1 inch thick Leg (bone-in and boneless), Chump, Shoulder, Loin

    6-8 minutes each side

    ¾ inch thick Cutlets

    6-8 minutes each side

    Burgers

    4-6 minutes each side

     


  • Roasting Bag+-


    If you own a fan oven it’s worth investigating roasting bags.

    Roasting bags are made from a special plastic which can withstand temperatures from freezing to Gas 6, 200°C. The bag prevents the food from drying out by retaining the natural moisture and its tasty juices. When the food gets hot during cooking, the air inside the bag expands and the roasting bag inflates like a balloon, enabling the joint to become self-basting and browning - so there's no need to watch over it every minute of the day!

    When using a roasting bag, dust the inside of the bag with a heaped teaspoon of flour. Don't oil or grease food. Put the joint inside the bag and turn it until the meat is evenly coated with flour. Allow sufficient air space around joint, and then tie nylon tie loosely to allow steam to escape from bag. Place the meat in a roasting tin and make one slit in the bag. Put the roasting tin in the oven ensuring it won't touch the sides or the roof.

    It’s important to cook food in these bags on the lower shelves of the oven as they must not touch or get near to exposed elements in conventional ovens.


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